Class, Wed, 4/19

Fastwrite: Last thoughts: How have social media changed the ways we interact with one another (or not)?

Fenton and Lee

  • Chapter 7, Building a Community: In what ways do you find the advice F&L offer about blogging on pp. 88–90 useful? In what ways might it be constrictive?
  • Interview tips, pp. 16-17: For use in your profile of a digital writer (due Thurs, 4/27).

Writing: Profile of a Digital Writer

To Do

  1. Thurs, 4/20, 10:00 am: Post a link to and reflection on your Writing as a Social Action to this site. Please identify four or five posts that particularly interest you, and comment on them.
  2. Fri, 4/21, class: We’ll discuss the Writing as Social Action posts.
  3. Mon, 4/24, class: Identify the digital writer you want to profile and set up a time to talk with them.

Rohnson and Carr: Maybe Not So Different After All

When comparing Jon Rohnson’s perspective on digital culture in So You’ve Been Publicly Shamed to Nicholas Carr’s in The Shadows, it is evident that they have very different stances on the topic of social media. It is clearly to any user of social media that it can be dangerous, we just have to make sure users are educated enough to avoid the mistakes that can be easily made. Carr has an overall negative standpoint on social media, while Johnson is more realistic on the topic. Johnson believes that as long as users understand the effects of social media and the proper etiquette of using it, then there should not be any major issues.

One woman in particular was unaware of proper social media etiquette, and allowed one series of tweets give her a horrible reputation not only on twitter, but in her job field and in society in general. In December of 2013, Justine Sacco made the mistake of tweeting about her travels in a distasteful, ignorant manner that gave her possibly the worst reputation on social media at the time. After receiving no responses to her online actions in the beginning, she assumed people did not think much of her tweets. By the time her next flight landed, she quickly learned that was incorrect. She checked her phone to see a message from an old friend reading “I’m so sorry to see what’s happening” (Rohnson 67). Without even thinking twice about what she was tweeting within each of the 140 character tweets, Sacco fell into the category of being publicly shamed, for the entire world of social media to see. She did not truly have bad intentions, but this just proves that things can be misinterpreted once they are posted online and it is definitely better to be safe than sorry.

Although Johnson does not have as negative of a viewpoint on digital culture as Carr does, his story about Sacco is definitely an example of social media gone wrong. Carr is right in situations like these; one may not know the negative impacts of social media and could potentially ruin an aspect of his or her life with it. Carr continues to explain how technology is impacting our brains, not necessarily in a positive manner. “What’s been harder to discern is the influence of technologies, particularly intellectual technologies, on the functioning of people’s brains (Carr 48). People commonly assume that it is more acceptable to say things on social media than in person since it is not said directly to a person’s face. In Johnson’s view of needing to be educated on how to properly conduct social media, he and Carr are most definitely on the same page in regards to Sacco, since she let the internet take over her actions.